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  • WaverWednesday: Tips for New Wavers from Veteran Kountry Kang
  • Michael James

WaverWednesday: Tips for New Wavers from Veteran Kountry Kang

What’s up wavers! From time to time we’ll have a member from the community sit down with us and discuss wave related topics. Today Rodney Giles aka “Kuntry Kang” came through to chat. Let’s get right to it.

So Kang tell us, what really made you get into the lifestyle of waving?

Growing up I always wanted something different versus the Afro like everyone had back then. I thought the wave look was stylish and I enjoyed the work to create different patterns. It really separated me from the rest at that time.

Interesting, with social networks being a main driver I’m pretty sure it’s easier to make a name for yourself in waving as well. What was the hardest obstacle you had to overcome during your wave journey?

My biggest obstacle I faced in the wave game was learning my "angles". Once I realized that my growth pattern was unique like my fingerprint, I was able to understand how to brush. Accepting that my angles would be different from someone else with the same pattern, I was able to make a lot of progress.



Angles are definitely important when starting your wave journey. So with that said, what advice would you have for someone that wants to get started in waving right now?

The best advice I can give a beginner to this craft is to be patient and learn the craft with an open mind and definitely learn your angles as you progress.

Speaking of angles, let’s talk about brushes. We know there’s all types of brushes on the market, does it really matter what kind of brush you have if you’re waving?

I encourage wavers to invest in a brush that meets their needs. Your staple brush as a waver should be one with 100% boar bristles. The brush should be a medium that can be used at high and low lengths. As long as you have that available you will be fine.

In your opinion, how much time should you spend on a brush session?

I believe you should brush as much as time and life allows. Brushing my hair and seeing progress is very therapeutic for me, and it encourages blood flow and healthy hair growth. At a minimum, there should be at least a 30-minute session in your day where you dedicate yourself some “you time” and study your craft.

Okay, last question. I always like to ask wavers this. Where do you see the waving community in 10 years?

In the next 10 years, I see the waving as a mainstream hairstyle. The era of well-groomed gentlemen is at hand and waving will be at the forefront.

Y’all heard it here first folks, a few tips and tricks on how to approach waving when starting out. Thanks to Rodney for stopping by to speak with us. Next week, we’ll go over more helpful tips to keep you wavy. See y’all next week and remember if you want to show us your progress, post a picture on Instagram using the hash tag “WaverWednesday”.

Getting started on your waver journey? Check out our new and improved Sleek Water™ Pomade here.

  • Michael James